fuckyeahnightmares:


anticipating-serendipity submitted 
Just came across this on my dashboard and thought it might have been from this blog. 
Nope.
Currently creeped out. 

fuckyeahnightmares:

anticipating-serendipity submitted 

Just came across this on my dashboard and thought it might have been from this blog. 

Nope.

Currently creeped out. 

toramorigan:

panduh-burr:

rocketsfan1081:

masscracc:

I.  WOULD.  DIE.

Lol

NO. FUCKING. WAY.

NOPE ALL THE WAY TO THE SUN

toramorigan:

panduh-burr:

rocketsfan1081:

masscracc:

I.  WOULD.  DIE.

Lol

NO. FUCKING. WAY.

NOPE ALL THE WAY TO THE SUN

unexplained-events:

Okiku, the haunted doll (Japan) resides at the Mannenji temple in the town of Iwamizawa (Hokkaido prefecture). According to the temple, the doll had short crop hair, but over time it has grown to roughly 10 inches (or 25 cm since the rest of the world uses the MS) and comes down to her knees. The hair is trimmed from time to time, but keeps growning back.

There is a story about a young boy that buys this doll for his little sister who happens to be sick. The little girl passes away due to her sickness a year later. A few weeks later the family started to notice the doll’s hair grow. Okiku is also the name of a maid that committed suicide and haunted her master.

Whatever the story or reason may be behind this creepy doll’s hair growth, this is so fucking creepy.

unexplained-events:

A strange creature dude caught on film. I wasn’t able to find any other sources to check if this was fake or not, but it’s pretty damn creepy even if it is. Notice how long the arms are, even as it’s crouched, as well as the shortened, squat shape of its head? If it is a legit creature caught on tape (aliens?!), it’s humanoid. It kind of looks like those ‘fallen angels,’ doesn’t it?

Three Ages of Woman and Death

unexplained-events:

image

This painting by Hans Baldung a German Renaissance artist is called “Three Ages of Woman and Death”. It shows the figure of death or as Hans Baldung called it “Der Ritter” holding up an hour glass. When observed, it came to be known that the painting had been altered and once it was x-rayed it showed death having an extra pair of upper-limbs.

asks:
Just wanted to share because I thought it was scary and interesting at the same time. I used to work at a nursing home and knew lots of nurses and CNA's that experienced a lot of activity from residents dying in their rooms. Also had an experience of my own. We had a patient who was a 99 year old man and was dying from old age and he suffered from arthritis. :( A week after he passed on, I remember hearing this horrible moaning coming from his room and he didn't have a room mate! Still scares me

Yea that would definitely freak me out a bit too. Thank you for sharing.

This reminded me of when I was a kid and I used to be terrified of the hospital in my home town, I truly believed there were ghosts everywhere in that place and I’m not sure if someone put the idea in my head or if its just something I thought up on my own but I believed they were just there waiting for people to die. 

paranormalexposure:

Alright. I just wanted to add one short story about a mythological beast from the Inuit. This happens to be one of my favorite pictures of all time, just because of the level of creepiness involved. These are Qallupilluit, Qallupilluk singular. Now, Qallupilluit are ocean creatures that steals lone children through cracks in the ice. There are many descriptions for a Qallupilluit, so I’ll name a couple popular ones. They are claimed to be short with blue skin, they wear parkas made of loon feathers, and their hair is home to a host of sea critters like crabs, and laced with seaweed.
Sometimes they are described with long hair, like the picture, and green skin with long finger nails. They are said to wear a amauti, a unique parka created with a pouch for a child to rest in.
Sometimes they are said to have scaly and bumpy skin. And even sometimes they have an eider duck parka. Most descriptions of the creature include a pouch for carrying children.
They are said to reek of sulfur, which I’m sure adds to their non-existant appeal. Inuit elders say that Qallupilluit have a specific humming sound that they make, and you can hear it when they are near. They also tend to jump out of the cracks in the ice without warning. And, the most creepy thing to me, they knock on the ice and you can hear the distinct tapping. If the ocean gets particularly wavy or steam rises, a Qallupilluit is hiding in the water.
No one is sure why they steal children. Some speculate loneliness. Others speculate dinner. Some variations of Qallupilluit mythology say that the child stolen will either die or turn into a mermaid to live underwater with the Qallupilluk that took them.
Most accounts claim that this was a legend created to scare children away from playing on the beach alone, or approaching cracking, drifting ice. But, even so, I wanted to include this because something about the idea of Qallupilluit really scares the crap out of me. Humming, ice tapping, baby kidnapping ocean creatures.
The Inuit sure knew how to scare the crap out of children (and possibly everyone else. Unless I’m alone here.)

paranormalexposure:

Alright. I just wanted to add one short story about a mythological beast from the Inuit. This happens to be one of my favorite pictures of all time, just because of the level of creepiness involved. These are Qallupilluit, Qallupilluk singular. Now, Qallupilluit are ocean creatures that steals lone children through cracks in the ice.

There are many descriptions for a Qallupilluit, so I’ll name a couple popular ones. They are claimed to be short with blue skin, they wear parkas made of loon feathers, and their hair is home to a host of sea critters like crabs, and laced with seaweed.

Sometimes they are described with long hair, like the picture, and green skin with long finger nails. They are said to wear a amauti, a unique parka created with a pouch for a child to rest in.

Sometimes they are said to have scaly and bumpy skin. And even sometimes they have an eider duck parka. Most descriptions of the creature include a pouch for carrying children.

They are said to reek of sulfur, which I’m sure adds to their non-existant appeal. Inuit elders say that Qallupilluit have a specific humming sound that they make, and you can hear it when they are near. They also tend to jump out of the cracks in the ice without warning. And, the most creepy thing to me, they knock on the ice and you can hear the distinct tapping. If the ocean gets particularly wavy or steam rises, a Qallupilluit is hiding in the water.

No one is sure why they steal children. Some speculate loneliness. Others speculate dinner. Some variations of Qallupilluit mythology say that the child stolen will either die or turn into a mermaid to live underwater with the Qallupilluk that took them.

Most accounts claim that this was a legend created to scare children away from playing on the beach alone, or approaching cracking, drifting ice. But, even so, I wanted to include this because something about the idea of Qallupilluit really scares the crap out of me. Humming, ice tapping, baby kidnapping ocean creatures.

The Inuit sure knew how to scare the crap out of children (and possibly everyone else. Unless I’m alone here.)